PHPBench.com was constructed as a way to open people's eyes to the fact that not every PHP code snippet will run at the same speed. You may be surprised at the results that this page generates, but that is ok. This page was also created so that you would be able to find discovery in these statistics and then maybe re-run these tests in your own server environment to play around with this idea yourself, by using the code examples (these code examples are automatically generated and as the code in my .php files change, so do they).

NOTE: You must keep in mind to refresh this page a few times to "catch" the right result. The numbers change sometimes drastically during each refresh. I assume that this is because of PHP's memory garbage collector that drops in randomly and also other processes that run on this machine have an influence.

NOTE: The microtime() method for testing out these tests has only been utilised for simplicities sake. If anything more advanced was used, those whom are just starting out on their PHP journey would have difficulties understanding.

Variable Type CheckingisSet() vs. empty() vs. is_array()

What is the performance of isSet() and empty(). Call 2'000x

+ 110 %

isSet() with var that was set

Total time: 176 µsview code

+ 106 %

empty() with var that was set

Total time: 169 µsview code

+ 101 %

isSet() with var that was *not* set

Total time: 161 µsview code

+ 101 %

empty() with var that was *not* set

Total time: 161 µsview code

+ 108 %

isSet() with array-var that was set

Total time: 172 µsview code

+ 105 %

empty() with array-var that was set

Total time: 168 µsview code

+ 101 %

isSet() with array-var that was *not* set

Total time: 162 µsview code

+ 100 %

empty() with array-var that was *not* set

Total time: 160 µsview code

+ 516 %

is_array() of an array

Total time: 826 µsview code

+ 516 %

is_array() of a string

Total time: 825 µsview code

+ 1186 %

is_array() of a non set value

Total time: 1898 µsview code

+ 1171 %

isSet() AND is_array() of a non set value

Total time: 1873 µsview code

Conclusion:

isSet() and empty() are identical. So alway check if val is set at all befor using type-checking. E.g. if (isSet($foo) AND is_array($foo))

Read Loop:foreach() vs. for() vs. while(list() = each())

What is the best way to loop a hash array?

Given is a Hash array with 100 elements, 24byte key and 10k data per entry

+ 100 %

foreach($aHash as $val);

Total time: 12 µsview code

+ 1045 %

while(list(,$val) = each($aHash));

Total time: 127 µsview code

+ 131 %

foreach($aHash as $key => $val);

Total time: 16 µsview code

+ 1112 %

while(list($key,$val) = each($aHash));

Total time: 135 µsview code

+ 378 %

foreach($aHash as $key=>$val) $tmp[] = $aHash[$key];

Total time: 46 µsview code

+ 1192 %

while(list($key) = each($aHash)) $tmp[] = $aHash[$key];

Total time: 145 µsview code

+ 675 %

Get key-/ value-array: foreach($aHash as $key[]=>$val[]);

Total time: 82 µsview code

+ 412 %

Get key-/ value-array: array_keys() / array_values()

Total time: 50 µsview code

+ 543 %

$key = array_keys($aHash);
$size = sizeOf($key);
for ($i=0; $i<$size; $i++) $tmp[] = $aHash[$key[$i]];

Total time: 66 µsview code

Conclusion:

In all cases I've found that the foreach loop is substantially faster than both the while() and for() loop procedures. One thing to note is that when using an entire loop from the start it's extremely good to use the reset() function in all examples

Given that the previous version of the tests have been very controvercial and incorrect, I must appologise for forgetting to implement the reset() function to allow the while() loops to start from the beginning instead of the end. Thanks to Anthony Bush for spotting this out.

Control Structuresswitch/case/default vs. if/elseif/else

Is a there a difference between switch and if structures?. Call 1'000x

+ 133 %

if and elseif (using ==)

Total time: 163 µsview code

+ 140 %

if, elseif and else (using ==)

Total time: 171 µsview code

+ 100 %

if and elseif (using ===)

Total time: 122 µsview code

+ 105 %

if, elseif and else (using ===)

Total time: 128 µsview code

+ 134 %

switch / case

Total time: 163 µsview code

+ 167 %

switch / case / default

Total time: 204 µsview code

Conclusion:

Using a switch/case or if/elseif is almost the same. Note that the test is unsing === (is exactly equal to) and is slightly faster then using == (is equal to).

Using the &-ref-operator...as a so called "alias"

Is a good idea to use the &-ref-operator to substitute (or alias) a complex mutidim-array? . Call 1'000x

E.g. $person = &$aHach["country"]["zip"]["street"]["number"]["name"]

+ 113 %

$alias = $aSingleDimArray[$i]

Total time: 639 µsview code

+ 100 %

$alias = &$aSingleDimArray[$i]

Total time: 565 µsview code

+ 133 %

$alias = $aMultiDimArray[$i]["aaaaa"]["aaaaaaaaaa"]

Total time: 752 µsview code

+ 354 %

$alias = &$aMultiDimArray[$i]["aaaaa"]["aaaaaaaaaa"]

Total time: 2002 µsview code

+ 152 %

$alias = veryMultiDimArray[$i]["a"]["aa"]["aaa"]["aaaa"]["aaaaa"]

Total time: 860 µsview code

+ 738 %

$alias = &$veryMultiDimArray[$i]["a"]["aa"]["aaa"]["aaaa"]["aaaaa"]

Total time: 4172 µsview code

Conclusion:

Whilst only using a one dimensional array, it's actually faster to use an alias, but anything larger will result in a performance drop.

Using the =&-ref-operator$obj = new SomeClass() vs. $obj =& new SomeClass()

Is a good idea to use the =&-ref-operator when creating a new object? Call 1'000x

+ 100 %

$obj = new SomeClass();

Total time: 415 µsview code

+ 121 %

$obj =& new SomeClass();

Total time: 501 µsview code

Conclusion:

There seams to be no difference in performance.

Modify Loop: foreach() vs. for vs. while(list() = each())

What would happen if we alter the reading loop test to test the results of a loop created to simply alter the data in each of the values in the array?

Given again is a Hash array with 100 elements, 24byte key and 10k data per entry.

+ 232 %

foreach($aHash as $key=>$val) $aHash[$key] .= "a";

Total time: 135 µsview code

+ 241 %

while(list($key) = each($aHash)) $aHash[$key] .= "a";

Total time: 140 µsview code

+ 100 %

$key = array_keys($aHash);
$size = sizeOf($key);
for ($i=0; $i<$size; $i++) $aHash[$key[$i]] .= "a";

Total time: 58 µsview code

Conclusion:

Proof in this example shows how functionally murderous the foreach() loop can be.

Counting LoopsFor vs. While

Is there an actual difference between counting up between the for loop and the while loop?

+ 113 %

for($i = 0; $i < 1000000; ++$i);

Total time: 64141 µsview code

+ 100 %

$i = 0; while($i < 1000000) ++$i;

Total time: 56797 µsview code

Conclusion:

Well there you have it, the while loop 90% of the time is indeed slightly faster

Using the =&-ref-operator$obj = $someClass->f() vs. $obj =& $someClass->f()

Is a good idea to use the =&-ref-operator when calling a function in an object? Call 1'000x

+ 100 %

$obj = $someClass->f();

Total time: 505 µsview code

+ 238 %

$obj =& $someClass->f();

Total time: 1204 µsview code

Conclusion:

Unless your extremely worried about how much RAM your using, leaving the &-ref-operator out seems like the slightly faster option.

Counting LoopsFor-loop test

Is it worth the effort to calculate the length of the loop in advance?

e.g. "for ($i=0; $i<$size; $i++)" instead of "for ($i=0; $i<sizeOf($x); $i++)"

A loop with 1000 keys with 1 byte values are given.

+ 101 %

With pre calc - count()

Total time: 176 µsview code

+ 53785 %

Without pre calc - count()

Total time: 93610 µsview code

+ 100 %

With pre calc - sizeof()

Total time: 174 µsview code

+ 53672 %

Without pre calc - sizeof()

Total time: 93414 µsview code

Conclusion:

Unsurprising results... this is one of the easiest things to implement in any application and is the widest agreed upon benchmarking item within the online PHP community. The results basically speak for themselves.

Quote Typesdouble (") vs. single (') quotes

Is a there a difference in using double (") and single (') quotes for strings. Call 1'000x

+ 117 %

single (') quotes. Just an empty string: $tmp[] = '';

Total time: 296 µsview code

+ 101 %

double (") quotes. Just an empty string: $tmp[] = "";

Total time: 255 µsview code

+ 100 %

single (') quotes. 20 bytes Text : $tmp[] = 'aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa';

Total time: 252 µsview code

+ 105 %

double (") quotes. 20 bytes Text : $tmp[] = "aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa";

Total time: 264 µsview code

+ 101 %

single (') quotes. 20 bytes Text and 3x a $ : $tmp[] = 'aa $ aaaa $ aaaa $ a';

Total time: 254 µsview code

+ 107 %

double (") quotes. 20 bytes Text and 3x a $ : $tmp[] = "aa $ aaaa $ aaaa $ a";

Total time: 269 µsview code

+ 102 %

double (") quotes. 20 bytes Text and 3x a \$ : $tmp[] = "aa \$ aaaa \$ aaaa \$ a";

Total time: 258 µsview code

Conclusion:

In today's versions of PHP it looks like this argument has been satisfied on both sides of the line. Lets all join together in harmony in this one!

String Outputecho vs. print

Is a there a difference between what option you use to output your content?. Called within Output Buffering 1'000x

+ 100 %

echo ''

Total time: 95 µsview code

+ 108 %

print ''

Total time: 102 µsview code

+ 158 %

echo 'aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa'

Total time: 150 µsview code

+ 171 %

print 'aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa'

Total time: 162 µsview code

+ 441 %

echo 'aaaaaaa'.'aaaaaaa'.'aaaaaaa'.'aaaaaaa'

Total time: 418 µsview code

+ 411 %

echo 'aaaaaaa','aaaaaaa','aaaaaaa','aaaaaaa'

Total time: 390 µsview code

+ 472 %

print 'aaaaaaa'.'aaaaaaa'.'aaaaaaa'.'aaaaaaa'

Total time: 448 µsview code

+ 486 %

$a = 'aaaaaaa';
echo 'aaaaaaa'.$a.'aaaaaaa'.$a

Total time: 461 µsview code

+ 491 %

$a = 'aaaaaaa';
echo 'aaaaaaa',$a,'aaaaaaa',$a

Total time: 466 µsview code

+ 511 %

$a = 'aaaaaaa';
print 'aaaaaaa'.$a.'aaaaaaa'.$a

Total time: 485 µsview code

+ 498 %

$a = 'aaaaaaa';
echo $a.$a.$a.$a

Total time: 473 µsview code

+ 470 %

$a = 'aaaaaaa';
echo $a,$a,$a,$a

Total time: 446 µsview code

+ 545 %

$a = 'aaaaaaa';
print $a,$a,$a,$a

Total time: 517 µsview code

Conclusion:

In reality the echo and print functions serve the exact purpose and therefore in the backend the exact same code applies. The one small thing to notice is that when using a comma to separate items whilst using the echo function, items run slightly faster.